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“Microsoft Critical Alert” virus. How to remove? (Uninstall guide)

removal by Ugnius Kiguolis - - | Type: Malware
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Learn what “Microsoft Critical Alert” scam is and how to not fall for it

“Microsoft Critical Alert” virus is a general term that covers various malicious programs that are used to scam innocent people and trick them into calling tech support scammers[1]. Such programs typically install their components on the system and in several web browsers to start torturing the victim with loads of intrusive pop-ups that threaten the victim and urge him to dial a particular number to get help from “Certified Microsoft Technicians,” who actually are scammers that seek to swindle money from you. There are various kinds of tech support scams, and every virus that is related to them displays a different message. Our team can point out one type that we come across most frequently – the scam that says “your computer has been infected with a virus and spyware. The following information is being stolen…” and suggests not to ignore the “critical alert” and call a “toll-free” number for help. When infected with such scamware, victim’s web browsers usually start launching phishing pages that are Microsoft Support page look-alikes[2]. Other phishing messages inform the victim about non-existent problems such as “.net frame work file missing due to some harmful virus,” “You have a ZEUS virus” or particular errors. So far the most popular bogus error codes that such scam pop-ups display are “Error # 7XX07,” “Error # 3658ad79cc3021a,” and “Error #268D3.” If one of these seems familiar, you should consider “Microsoft Critical Alert” removal as a matter of utmost importance.The screenshot of Microsoft Critical Alert scam

Tech support scammers usually register domains that have anything to do with words “security,” “alert” or “Microsoft.”[3] More experienced computer users usually quickly understand that they are deceptive, however, less tech-savvy users might not spot the ruse and believe that the website really belongs to Microsoft. Another detail that unveils the deceit is that the scary messages are usually full of grammar or spelling mistakes, and obviously Microsoft would never leave them in messages designed for users. If you noticed that your browser unexpectedly causes redirects to shady websites that trigger such alerts to you, we highly recommend you to scan the system with anti-malware software to identify and remove “Microsoft Critical Alert” pop-up virus. Calling the number provided in the message will only connect you with tech support scammers that will try to convince you that you need to fix imaginary problems using some rogue security software[4] they will suggest buying. All that scammers want to do is to either rip you off or place malware[5] on your computer. Therefore, you should never provide any sensitive data to them or remote access to your PC. Ideally, do not call them, ever!

How could I install such program on my system?

“Microsoft Critical Alert” malware can be distributed via spam, however, in most cases, users install it alongside untrustworthy freeware. Choosing the wrong source to download software from can lead to the installation of potentially unwanted programs or even malware, so it is recommended to do a little digging about the website that provides the download link. Finally, it is very important to adjust installation settings in the right way. Even legitimate download sites can be full of software packages, and if you do not desire to infect your PC with several vague programs, you should decompose them before installing the core software. Remember that you should always choose Custom or Advanced settings for installing software because they reveal all unexpected additions and allow you to drop them off if needed. Do not believe that “recommended” software installation settings such as Default or Standard are the “right ones” only because the installer suggests choosing them. Finally, keep your computer protection software running at all times so that it could identify and detect malicious files and programs trying to hijack your computer.

How can I find and remove “Microsoft Critical Alert” malware?

If your browser started to display deceptive alerts and urge you to call toll-free helpline because, according to suspicious “Microsoft technicians,” your computer is all messed up, remove “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus immediately. Do not waste your valuable time calling the scammers – better check your PC with automatic malware removal tools. We guarantee that your antivirus or anti-malware software will detect a “Tech support scam” type virus instead of some suspicious Trojan that the phishing web page tells you about. For “Microsoft Critical Alert” removal, we highly recommend using Reimage software. To start it, you might need to reboot your PC in a Safe Mode with Networking (see instructions provided below).

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What to do if failed?
If you failed to remove infection using Reimage, submit a question to our support team and provide as much details as possible.
Reimage is recommended to uninstall “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus. Free scanner allows you to check whether your PC is infected or not. If you need to remove malware, you have to purchase the licensed version of Reimage malware removal tool.

More information about this program can be found in Reimage review.

More information about this program can be found in Reimage review.
Alternate Software
Plumbytes Anti-Malware
We have tested Plumbytes Anti-Malware's efficiency in removing “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus (2017-05-05)
Malwarebytes Anti Malware
We have tested Malwarebytes Anti Malware's efficiency in removing “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus (2017-05-05)
Hitman Pro
We have tested Hitman Pro's efficiency in removing “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus (2017-05-05)
Webroot SecureAnywhere AntiVirus
We have tested Webroot SecureAnywhere AntiVirus's efficiency in removing “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus (2017-05-05)

Manual “Microsoft Critical Alert” virus Removal Guide:

Remove “Microsoft Critical Alert” using Safe Mode with Networking

Reimage is a tool to detect malware.
You need to purchase Full version to remove infections.
More information about Reimage.

Reboot your PC according to these instructions and then run anti-malware software to identify and remove the virus that sends these bogus alerts to you.

  • Step 1: Reboot your computer to Safe Mode with Networking

    Windows 7 / Vista / XP
    1. Click Start Shutdown Restart OK.
    2. When your computer becomes active, start pressing F8 multiple times until you see the Advanced Boot Options window.
    3. Select Safe Mode with Networking from the list Select 'Safe Mode with Networking'

    Windows 10 / Windows 8
    1. Press the Power button at the Windows login screen. Now press and hold Shift, which is on your keyboard, and click Restart..
    2. Now select Troubleshoot Advanced options Startup Settings and finally press Restart.
    3. Once your computer becomes active, select Enable Safe Mode with Networking in Startup Settings window. Select 'Enable Safe Mode with Networking'
  • Step 2: Remove “Microsoft Critical Alert”

    Log in to your infected account and start the browser. Download Reimage or other legitimate anti-spyware program. Update it before a full system scan and remove malicious files that belong to your ransomware and complete “Microsoft Critical Alert” removal.

If your ransomware is blocking Safe Mode with Networking, try further method.

Remove “Microsoft Critical Alert” using System Restore

Reimage is a tool to detect malware.
You need to purchase Full version to remove infections.
More information about Reimage.

  • Step 1: Reboot your computer to Safe Mode with Command Prompt

    Windows 7 / Vista / XP
    1. Click Start Shutdown Restart OK.
    2. When your computer becomes active, start pressing F8 multiple times until you see the Advanced Boot Options window.
    3. Select Command Prompt from the list Select 'Safe Mode with Command Prompt'

    Windows 10 / Windows 8
    1. Press the Power button at the Windows login screen. Now press and hold Shift, which is on your keyboard, and click Restart..
    2. Now select Troubleshoot Advanced options Startup Settings and finally press Restart.
    3. Once your computer becomes active, select Enable Safe Mode with Command Prompt in Startup Settings window. Select 'Enable Safe Mode with Command Prompt'
  • Step 2: Restore your system files and settings
    1. Once the Command Prompt window shows up, enter cd restore and click Enter. Enter 'cd restore' without quotes and press 'Enter'
    2. Now type rstrui.exe and press Enter again.. Enter 'rstrui.exe' without quotes and press 'Enter'
    3. When a new window shows up, click Next and select your restore point that is prior the infiltration of “Microsoft Critical Alert”. After doing that, click Next. When 'System Restore' window shows up, select 'Next' Select your restore point and click 'Next'
    4. Now click Yes to start system restore. Click 'Yes' and start system restore
    Once you restore your system to a previous date, download and scan your computer with Reimage and make sure that “Microsoft Critical Alert” removal is performed successfully.

Finally, you should always think about the protection of crypto-ransomwares. In order to protect your computer from “Microsoft Critical Alert” and other ransomwares, use a reputable anti-spyware, such as Reimage, Plumbytes Anti-MalwareWebroot SecureAnywhere AntiVirus or Malwarebytes Anti Malware

Ugnius Kiguolis
Ugnius Kiguolis - The mastermind

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References

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  • Jeff

    those indian scammers do not respect anyone!!! i just cant understand why no one tracks them down! is telephone, come on!!

  • Leticia

    Nasty scammers deceived my grandpa and made him pay 200$ for some useless software including adblocker, which is FREE! CAN YOU BELIEVE IT. I am short of words! Truly!

  • Laura

    Scammers once tried to scam me. I recorded the entire conversation and uploaded it to Youtube so that others would know what kind of stuff these scammers try to sell you. Dont believe what they say, thats the only advice I can give to you

  • Frederic

    My god, the moment I hear “microsoft tech support help line” in strong indian accent immediately makes me drop the phone.