Second lawsuit over WGA filed

In June, 2006, Brian Johnson, a computer user from Los Angeles, sued Microsoft over its Windows Genuine Advantage tool calling it a spyware program. A class action lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Seattle, alleges that the software giant did not provide important details on the Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) update, which was introduced in 2004.

After only a few days, Engineered Process Controls, Univex and several other companies filed a similar lawsuit, alleging that Microsoft distributed and installed a spyware program as a critical security update.

Microsoft denies that WGA is spyware, and says that both lawsuits “are without merit”. As a Microsoft spokesman said, they distort the software giant’s anti-piracy program. Nevertheless, more and more people believe that Microsoft has violated anti-spyware and consumer protection laws.

It must be noted that a few reports have appeared stating that Microsoft is dropping Windows Genuine Advantage. Although this information remains unchecked, it can be true. Microsoft has already published instructions for disabling undisclosed WGA functions, and the latest version of WGA no longer transfers any information to Microsoft.