The UK?€™s New Bill Tries to Censor Pornography on the Internet

This new Online Safety Bill states that ISP’s and mobile telecoms should give porn-free internet connection by default. However, if an adult wants, he can choose an uncensored porn – allowed version, which will provide sites with adult content that has 18+ verification systems.

In addition, This Bill wants to filter every single Internet enabled electronic device that can download content. ISP’s and telecoms should give clear information about online safety, to ensure that a child is using the computer device safely.

However, the ISP Association argues that this filtering by default would only reduce parent’s interest, and it only would make them feel a fake sense of security. And the biggest question is – who will decide what is pornographic and what is not?

One concern raises that filtering technologies might over-block, for example, breastfeeding guidance’s. The fact is that there are a lot of filtered network services, where parents can set the blacklists that filter and block content, including porn. Nonetheless, it was found that those filters don’t always work very well. For example, one of the filters didn’t filter one of the biggest pornography sites in the web.

So now, then the government tries to legislate in this way, things might only lead to confusion. ISP’s should let the customer decide. Having censored filters by default might seem disproportionate and unnecessary approach to controlling access. In addition, if in order to access pornography you will need to validate your age, so you will need to give your identification information and then you will be listen on a database as someone who wanted to access porn.

Information Commissioner Office says that they recognize the importance of protecting people who could be on such lists, but the best way to protect them is for such data not to exist. There are technologies for parents who control what their kids see, there’s no reason to add another barrier for that.

This bill is a private member’s bill, so it won’t get anywhere unless it gets government support. It seems that Culture, Media and Sports departments clearly doesn’t support this, and they prefer the current flexible system. To conclude, this Bill probably will close, but we have to know what’s happening here, and we have to show our opinion in time.

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